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20130103
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the story of the civil war at sea and on the rivers, jim, you were putting the finishing touches on your new book. craig, you were preparing four book for publication as well, and now both dish have to do this the way they do on the talk shows -- so, now, james mcpherson's war on the waters, the union and confederate navies, 1861 to 1865, and craig's civil war at sea, both very handsomely done, and it's good because we get to resume our conversation. we barely broke the surface. let's get right to it. because we spoke for an hour last time and we got to about january of 1862. so i'll assume you all know about 1861. and get to something that jim pointed out in his book, which i found rather interesting, and that is that 150 years ago this month, eye side from all the other things going on, including the first shudders of the realization that lincoln had actually promulgated an emancipation proclaimation. the blockade was in force in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers s
suffered through reading my manuscript twice, and lieutenant general jim duquette, if he is here. oh, there you are. gym is the exception to everything i'm saying tonight about the generals. [laughter] a couple of things about jim. is now retired. the only channel i know who retired and enrolled in a ph.d at johns hopkins in philosophy, which is a interesting degree. but jim said you would need to think more on the rule of civilians. he was totally right. in the rewrite of the book is became a major theme. what works, what doesn't work. marshall and was up to me as a model of good civil-military relations, good discourse. they are not particularly friendly spin you say marshall we refuse to have dinner with -- >> didn't like having dinner with them. refuse to laugh at their jokes when fdr referred to as george. he made it clear to his name was general marshall. the first time that marshall ever went to hyde park, roosevelt's home, was for his funeral to be a pallbearer. he kept his distance. yes he was selected for the job because he was candid with roosevelt. before is on the chief
, were penetrating in 1995 and 1994 into the soils. he went back to vietnam with his son jim who's one of the proponents of the mission. he was the highest ranking military figure to return to vietnam at that time. and he was a leader in convincing president clinton to open, to normalize relations with vietnam. and that's another interesting -- and, actually, president clinton asked him to get general westmoreland onboard on all this. and bud played a very central role in getting general westmoreland to recognize the importance of opening up a relationship with vietnam. and so the watch really never ended for bud. and that's why in 1998 the president of the united states, bill clinton, would give him the presidential medal of freedom for everything he had done on behalf of generations of people. he never stopped fighting, as president clinton said. never stopped fighting for those who had no power. so my book is not so much a story about his different commands, and it's not an official naval history. i leave that to the next generation of naval historians who will have is the access to
if he is here. there you are. jim dudek is the exception to every i'm saying tonight about generals by the way. a couple of things about jim dudek district may, now retired the only channel i know who upon retirement wrote in a phd program in john hopkinson philosophy, which is an interesting career move. but in review of my manuscript cecchini to think more in the role of civilians and he was totally right and in the rewrite, this became a major theme. both works, what doesn't work? marshland was developed as a model is good relations, good discourse. not particularly friendly. >> eisai marshal refuse to dinner. >> refuse to laugh at his jokes come when fdr refers to miss church coming he makes it clear his name is general marshall and the first time marshall ever went to hyde park, roosevelts home, was for his hero to be a pallbearer. he kept his distance commedia was selected for the job because he was candid with roosevelt. before army chief of staff, brigadier in the oval office and basically roosevelt was was a month since his fate a minute, unique to hear me out here. he deci
and choice and possibility and sacrifice. so wonder if you could go back. i know you were in the jim crow south in baker county, in georgia and you were daddy's girl. and trying to get all gangster driving the tractor at 4 years old and in the streets and neighborhood. tell us about that. >> well, you know, we were in baker county, out, you hear about, you read about some of the i have haves of earlier years but the gator and the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator actually ruled every thing, everyone in the county. you can't imagine looking at the western from earlier days anyone like him but he was worse than what you have seen in your worst western. but growing up in that we, my family lived, my great-great grandparents had come to baker county. i don't know whether they came as slaves or not but i know they end up there as share croppers and with the up tent on buying land and that they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up was still today called hawkins town and lots of family. but it was that way, you know, the hawkins lived in one a
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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